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Photo ID: 981
Gallery ID: 62
Photo Title: Barranco de Guayadeque, Gran Canaria, Canary Islands.
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Keywords:
barranco de guayadeque, gran canaria, canary islands, atlantic islands, macaronesia, oceanic islands, volcanic islands, gorge, ravine, barranco, canyon, lava, volcano, lava flow, cinder, strombolian cones, volcanic dike, intense rain, erosion, archaeology, guanche, pre hispanic, natural monument.
Description:
The Barranco de Guayadeque is an extremely deep and narrow gorge or ravine located on the eastern part of Gran Canaria. The gorge originates from the very top of the eastern highlands , close to the Caldera de Los Martelles and La Calderilla, and runs for some 20 kilometres down to the sea near to the airport. It is believed to have began its formation around one million years ago at a time when the rainfall was very much more intense than is today, with an estimated annual average of 2000 mm a year. The wall of the ravine are composed of layer upon layer of volcanic lava flows, which originated from the highlands and there are also eroded remains of more recent activity, composed of reddish coloured cinders. The erosion has also revealed numerous volcanic dikes, through which lava once flowed to supply these more recent strombolian cones. Many archaeological remains have also been found within this area, revealing a once thriving Pre Hispanic community, that of the Guanche people who lived within the ravine’s numerous caves. The outstanding environmental and heritage value of this area has led it to being declared a Natural Monument. In this image, the remains of volcanic dikes have been exposed by erosion, dikes which perhaps were the feeder vents for more recent strombolian volcanic activity
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